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Letter, 9 April 1864, from an unknown Union officer named Andrew, stationed at Fort Scott, Arlington, Virginia, to his wife Sarah.

He asks about his children and adds that he has not received any letters from his wife.

] from Robert [-----] to his brother John about serving as a member of the provost guard for Winchester, Virginia. He also laments the destruction at Fredericksburg, Virginia, but expresses his belief that General Burnside's campaign will ultimately capture Richmond.

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The subject of the letter includes, the officers tooth ache and extraction, his wifes tooth extraction and gold filling, being charged in error for light blue military pants, studying field and light artillery, and the 1864 election of William Alfred Buckingham as Governor of Connecticut.

He provides a list of prices for goods in Winchester.

Robert comments that he is suffering from jaundice, but is getting better; notes that the guard arrested some cavalrymen for a disturbance in a barber shop; states that citizens seeking passes must take the oath of allegiance; and asks for a pair of boots.

Contains descriptions of the number of soldiers aboard ship, the James River and the shoreline along the James River, food and living conditions aboard ship, and participation in military operations south of the James River between Petersburg and Richmond.

Letter, 5-, from a soldier in the 33rd Battery New York Battery Light Artillery, 3rd Division, 10th Army Corps, who was sailing up the James River on the ship Rip Van Winkle and subsequently fighting between Petersburg and Richmond. Letter, 23 July 1893, discusses the unveiling of the Confederate soldiers monument in Nottoway County, at which General Fitzhugh Lee (1835-1905) spoke. Letters, 1889-1896, from Fannie [-----] in Nottoway County, Virginia, to her relatives consisting of news of her family, information on her crops and livestock, and news of people in Nottoway County including deaths. C.; commenting on rumors of the death of Confederate General Joseph Johnston at the battle of Seven Pines (Fair Oaks); noting that the Confederates have improved in their treatment of Union wounded and prisoners; and complaining about an address given by Massachusetts Governor John Andrews, stating that Massachusetts men are fighting for the Union, not to abolish slavery. Letter, 8 June 1862, from Frank [-----], a Massachusetts soldier, to his brother, informing his brother that he is headed to the hospital in Washington D. Letter, 9 June 1862, from Newton [-----], Ropers Mills, Virginia, to his brother Robert, describing action in the battle of Seven Pines and Fair Oaks, Virginia.

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